Hydroponics

Hydroponics

We are nearing a world population of 7.8 billion people and our world is already experiencing serious problems with soil erosion, water eutrophication and suitable arable land is at a premium, puching agriculture further and further into encroaching into the wilderness.
With over 1 million species lost, we must find alternatives to traditional agriculture. Hydroponics could be the answer, but many object to eating food fed by artificial chemicals.
Organic hydroponics may be the answer. This is a branch of hydroponic culture systems that applies organic agriculture concepts and methods. Unlike conventional hydroponics,  development has focused on the use of organic fertiliser, actively degraded into inorganic nutrients using multiple parallel mineralisation by ammonification and nitrification. Slected microorganisms are cultured in a solution that can then can be used as the hydroponic feed. Practical methods of organic hydroponics were developed by the National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), Japan, 2005, and applied in a growing number of projects.

It should be noted that many growers do not recognise hydropnics as ‘organic’.